Angus & Felix

Words: JOSH RAY
August 20, 2013

This leaves many young; artists, musicians, journalists and filmmakers uncertain about their place in the world, having to work monotonous jobs in order to make ends meet whilst side-lining their creativity. This issue has become ever more prevalent in today’s economic climate as culture is nearly always the first to feel the crunch in harsh times, leaving an immense anxiety amongst the city’s young creatives.


Liverpool is a strange city for young people finding their feet, especially in careers centred around creativity. Whilst the city – named Capital of Culture in 2008 – may have an unrivalled grassroots arts scene which persistently nourishes emerging talent, it regrettably lacks enough finances to allow them to make a living out of their work.

This leaves many young; artists, musicians, journalists and filmmakers uncertain about their place in the world, having to work monotonous jobs in order to make ends meet whilst side-lining their creativity. This issue has become ever more prevalent in today’s economic climate as culture is nearly always the first to feel the crunch in harsh times, leaving an immense anxiety amongst the city’s young creatives.

Sin título-1

Local artist KATIE CRAVEN has taken this increasingly prevalent issue as inspiration for her latest work – Angus & Felix – a quarterly comic book highlighting the “current obstacles and anxieties of being a young adult and finding your place in the world.”

Unveiled at the soon-to-be-lost venue Drop the Dumbells, the first issue introduces the idiosyncratic monsters Angus & Felix as they stumble across a girl lying outside her house amidst empty liquor bottles, a packed suitcase and a newspaper which headline reads: “This generation doesn’t talk about dreams or aspirations. They talk about getting by, surviving”.

Upon approaching the girl, the two monsters find that her life is lacking direction and so decide to bring her along on their travels, giving her a cape which allows her to fly away with them. The final frame of the issue – depicting the three airborne characters silhouetted against the moon was intricately imposed on the Drop the Dumbells wall by Craven, granting those in attendance a grand demonstration of her surreal, pop-art inspired style of black and white illustration.

comic


< Back